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big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
america - a new voice in american journalism - >>introduces america tonight. >>in egypt, police fired teargas at supporters of the ... >>a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. [[voiceover]] they risk never returning to the united states. >>grounded. >>real. >>unconventional. [[voiceover]] we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. >>an escape from the expected. >>i'm a cancer survivor. not only cancer, but brain cancer. ♪ [ cheers ] content while setting new standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> the horrors of solitary confinement in prison on movies and television, on shawshank redemption, and hbo's oz. whatever it's called, with he all know it's a place you don't want to go. >> i want to protect you. ple you out of that one bunk and cast you out with the sodomites. >> to take a closer look at solitary,
and other opportunities that we're all hopeful will be in iowa's and america's future. so recent studies have shown that throughout the united states, but also in iowa, that all growth in work force in the next 30 years will be attributable to immigrants, because of this demographic of retiring baby boomers and the generation coming after them. and of course also as i think senator harkin alluded to, we also need to not only fill jobs that are are currently here, but we need to create jobs, we need known vagues. and this is where immigrants have really contributed to america as well. immigrants are are more likely as a group to start businesses. immigrants are more likely to have a patent when they are working in the high tech industries and that, than native born counterparts. then finally we have to remember that we live in a small world. we can't isolate america from the rest of the world. and that's true for our economy. so therefore our economy is not a zero sum game, our work force is not a zero sum game. businesses and workers adapt to changing policies and changing circumstances.
unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, latest online at aljazeera.com. ♪ >> it is a desperate gamble for millions of immigrants trying to cross the u.s.-mexico border. people will risk their own lives even that of their children for the opportunity. america tonight's rob reynolds traveled to the border areas to hear from the survivors about their challenges. some of the images in the stories they tell may be disturbing. >> reporter: a corner of the cemetery in texas is set aside for th the lost and left behind. these are the graves of unknown migrants from mexico and central america who died lonely deaths in the bad lands of south texas. >> it's horrible. it's senseless death. i don't really understand it. >> reporter: vinnie martinez is chief deputy sheriff of brooks county last year he reported well over 100 dead migrants. today
's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> 50 years after martin luther king junior delivered his monumental i have a dream speech, tens of thousands are in washington to commemorate that dream. some worry that the advances are in dangery of being rolled back. >> reporter: the crowds that massed in front of the lincoln mey morial didn't match the 200,000 or more who watched martin luther king at the same spot half a century ago. but their determination to see america redeem his vision was strong, as children they were at the 25th anniversary of the march and brought their own kids to the 50 year commemoration. >> there are a lot of people who still care about equity and justice in the united states and recognize we haven't made it, but we are also fighting for the same cause. >> reporter: the speakers underlined the obstacles that still hindered black
could spark a wider conflict that disrupts oil supplies in the mideast. now america itself imports 40% of its demand and while that sounds like a lot it's the reverse of where we were in 2005 where we imported 60% from abroad. what's happened is advances after oil extracting in the gulf of mexico. now, fracking technology works by drilling deep in to rock formation, shale formations and injecting chemicals in the rock releasing oil and gas. this is controversial. they say it leases toxic gases in to the water table. earthquakes are reporting with greater freagreater frequency. all across america there is oil and gas trapped in shale. the formation in the northeast. these are two of the biggest shale plays where fracking is involved. there is more where there is conventional oil in saudi arabia. that may not last for more than a few years but the implication of this are obvious. the u.s. complicates another military adventure many to the middle east. this new domestic energy boom will fuel america's next big economic boom. already the american factories are taking a look at the natural
.m. eastern here on c- span. ," ours weeks "newsmakers guest is the ceo of heritage action for america. he talks about his organization's agenda and its position on issues pertaining to health care and immigration. here's a preview. [video clip] >> in this environment right now, it is very difficult to handle immigration the way we should be. which is bypassing piecemeal pieces of legislation, getting the border secure. we also have a gigantic imbalance between labor supply and labor demand. all of those questions do not require amnesty. you can get all of the economic benefits that people talk about in fixing our broken immigration system without giving amnesty at this time. that is the position we support. unfortunately in this environment right now, the moment something passes the house, the pressure on immigration, which has dissipated over the last couple of weeks and months, will immediately be back in the forefront. >> you can watch the entire interview with michael needham of heritage action form for america on newsmakers -- on "newsmakers" sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern and 6:00 p.m
: race, slavery and the troubled history of america's universities." we wrap up tonight's prime time programming at 11 p.m. eastern with the biography of charles manson. .. thank you very much for that lovely introduction. i suspect all of you know this but ladies and gentlemen, tonight you will be in the presence of a literary giant. among latin american giants, gabriel marquez is known for mesmerizing, others educate, and captivate, and then there is eduardo galeano. truth teller, galvanize her, firebrand, a writer who tells us about history, that those who inhabit the corridors of power don't want us to know more truly understand. eduardo galeano was born a commentator, it seems. by the time he was 14 he was publishing cartoons in newspapers. by 20 he was the editor of the left-wing weekly newsletter, he became the top executive of a paper of record. in 1971 at the tender age of 31 he published day hair raising indictment of north american influence on the hemisphere. the open veins of latin america. four years ago at the summit of the americas, hugo chavez hand and a copy of that
opportunities that, you hopeful will be in iowa's and america's future. studies have shown that throughout the united iowa, that also in all growth in workforce in the 30 years will be attributable to immigrants. because of this demographic of retiring baby-boomers and the after them.oming and, of course, also, i think, alluded to, we also need to fill jobs that are currently here. need to create jobs, we need innovation. this is where immigrants have contributed to america as well. immigrants are more likely as a roup to start businesses, immigrants are more likely to have a patent when they're high-tech the industries and that than native foreign counterparts. and then finally, we have to we live in a small world. we can't isolate america from rest of the world. economy.'s true for our and so therefore our economy is sum game. our workforce is not a zero sum game. usinesses and workers adapt to changing policies and circumstances. so we work with the rest of the a sense we're in competition for the rest of the world. or exports, imports, and workforce. so immigration from the business sh
to the scientists and allowed america to take the lead and develop the atomic bomb. by the time the bombs were dropped on hiroshima and nagasaki the british role in all of this have been completely forgotten. the sad part of the story is later in his life churchill who was kind of dismissed with nuclear technology throughout his career as a politician suddenly becomes aware of how destructive and how dangerous it is existentially. he only had that realization 20 years earlier it would have reshaped what became a nuclear arms locally. at the time i think he was just really unaware of the potentiality of atomic energy and dismissed it and kept saying i'm very happy with explosives we are to have. >> lara heimert a lot of the conversation here at bookexpo america this year is about e-books still. does basic have been approached to e-books? have they been helpful to your business? >> we love e-books. we love it when people have more ways to read books and what we find is a lot of people toggle between the two. they don't become exclusive e-book readers and don't assert their bookshelves. i use my
and put a platform together that focuses on them. not everybody in america wants a business and money is everything to them. a lot of folks want to spend time with their families. work in community groups. spend time at their church. we, as republicans, believe that is a good thing. we do not talk about it. and we do not talk to them. it is to take a page out of our book and start putting forth an agenda of ideas to raise up folks who want to vote for us. you saw the last election. they did not want to vote for president obama. but at least he went and talked to them and about them. we did not do that. we marginalized them. first and foremost, we need to reject the idea that if we build the economy, everybody will be fine. most people have holes in their boats. we need to talk about people who have holes in their boats. we all do. we all need help from each other. the second thing is we need to talk less about the culture. he people who do this is those who do not want to talk about culture in the first place. as a result, do not engage as we have in this party. i will give you an exa
. -- andrybody in america money is everything to them. a lot of folks want to spend time with their families. work and community groups. spend time at their church. we as republicans believe that is a good inc.. we do not talk about it. and we do not talk to them. -- that is a good thing. it is to take a page out of our book and start putting forth an upnda of ideas to raise folks who want to vote for us. you side and the last election. they do not want to vote for president obama. but at least he went and talked to them and about them. we did not do that. we marginalized them. --st and foremost, we need first and foremost, we need to reject the idea that if we build to becoming, everybody will be fine. -- if we build the economy, everybody will be fine. most people have holes in their boats. we need to talk about people who have holes in their boats. we all do. we all need help from each other. [applause] the second inc. as we be to talk less about the culture area -- thing is we need to talk less about the culture. the people who do this is who do not want to talk about culture in the firs
america." >> this is "bbc world news america." thatay after the clashes killed more than 600 people in egypt, president obama condemned the violence but cut short of cutting off aid. >> our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets. >> a car bomb rips through a suburb of beirut, killing 18 people and a stronghold of hezbollah. revealed species was to the world today. actually it has been hiding in plain sight. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. egypt's capital city has been the scene of morning, anger, and unrest after the clashes between security forces and supporters that -- of mohamed morsi. more than 600 people have died and their opponents say the number is higher. tonight the un security council is getting an emergency briefing. jeremy bowen reports from cairo on the days events. the setsrought ice up of the mops because in cairo, dead bodies decompose sought -- quickly. inside there were 200 in trouts, surrounded by their families. they blame the army commander. this is my brother,
money real. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? it drives discussion across america. share your story on tv and online. >> welcome back. these are our top stories at this hour. syrian rebels are accusing the government of launching a nerve gas attack they say killed hundreds, including children. the alleged attack comes hours after a team of u.n. weapons experts arrived in damascus to investigate previous attacks. >> bradley ma
, i think we could not be in a much better place than america to have this discussion right now. i am joined by a fabulous panel of experts. usy are going to enlighten and him pack the relationship between growth in texas. many have probably seen him on tv. it ordered member of the wall street journal, he writes about immigration, taxes, many things. i am sure you have read his articles. he has been an advocate for years, a scholar, and we are privileged to have you here, steve. thank you for coming. youthing you do well is look state-by-state a lot. you talk about growth and you look at the state and evidence. and what are growing role are immigrants playing in the country? >> first of all, when amity called me and asked me to come here to dallas to speak, i leapt amthe opportunity, because i an admirer of george w. bush. thank you for the invitation. thunder a little bit when you talk about four percent growth year it i would add to what you said, that i do not think we can accomplish four percent growth without immigration. it is a precondition to get to that higher growth rate. it
jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. introduces america tonight. >> in egypt police fired tear gas -- >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. >> they risk never returning to the united states. >> we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. ♪ >>> welcome back everyone, as president obama tries to ratchet up support for his economic policies he is targeting a key constituency focused on the soaring cost of higher education. david shuster has the report. [ cheers ] >> at the university of buffalo, the president announced ambitious changes to make colleges more affordable and accountable for their costs. >> college has never been more expensive. over the past three decades, the average tuition at a public, four-year college has gone up by more than 250%. >
that of their children for the opportunity. america tonight's rob reynolds traveled to the border areas to hear from the survivors about their challenges. some of the images in the stories they tell may be disturbing. >> reporter: a corner of the cemetery in texas is set aside for th the lost and left behind. these are the graves of unknown migrants from mexico and central america who died lonely deaths in the bad lands of south texas. >> it's horrible. it's senseless death. i don't really understand it. >> reporter: vinnie martinez is chief deputy sheriff of brooks county last year he reported well over 100 dead migrants. today numbers are on trend to exceed that. >> from year-to-date we're 92% increase from 2012. we had 129 in 2012. we see the influx. we see the volume high on pedestrians markers coming through the brush . >> reporter: an impoverished crumbling town near the mexican border. but the checkpoint just south of town is the last barrier for migrants to dallas and beyond. human smugglers have found ways to evade the checkpoint. migrants rush out of the smugglers' vehicles and hide in the
lyons recounts the introduction of the enlightenment to america and the role that benjamin franklin played in its development. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you for those kind words. i'd forgotten about some of that stuff. [laughter] that's always good to hear a refresher course. it's really wonderful to be here in seattle. as i mentioned to some of you when i first arrived, my wife and i have only recently relocated to the pacific northwest. we're based out of portland, oregon, having left washington, d.c., the other washington. there is one institution i miss and i'll probably always miss, and that's the library of congress where i wrote this book and most of my three earlier books as well. but i know that quality of life and the quality of discourse, particularly civic discourse, will be greatly improved. [laughter] and i know, also, that benjamin franklin would be particularly pleased to know that i'm speaking here tonight, and he would commend this institution on its civic-mindedness. franklin was known as a projector, that is he loves social projects, and
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
comcast "global crossings" immigration, civilization and america by alvaro vargas llosa comes at a perfect moment and it puts immigration in historical context showing how so much of the debate today is not actually new in american politics and that we can be guided by a lot of american experience, long american experience. it's better to let the author talk to us about that. my good friend alvaro vargas llosa is the senior fellow at the center for global prosperity at the independent institute who publishes -- who has published this book. he has been a nationally syndicated columnist for the "washington post" writers group. he has been the author of numerous books including the che guevara risk and the guide to perfect latin american idiot which was a bestseller in the spanish edition in latin america. he is a big what has in his columns that appear throughout latin america every week and has contributed to leading newspapers in the united states. he has been a board member of the "miami herald" publishing company and an op-ed page editor and columnist for the "miami herald." i could go o
at this point in time in america. >> she is not political, she is not speaking out politically the way that abigail did with her husband. she is not a public political figure speaking out on these things. she has her own private views on some things. her views on politics are more about how people behaved. she is much more interested in everyone conducting themselves properly. even people on her own side. she doesn't like it when people who support the policies that her husband supported have crossed a line in terms of decorum. she is not trying to get out -- she's not an activist. i would not want to say that. >> nearly 100 years until women have the right to vote, we should point out for our younger viewers. what role could they play? where did their power come from? >> there is a coda to this story. just as john quincy became more and more outspoken in his opposition to slavery, and famously played a role in the amistad case. there was something between louisa and the green key sisters, who were pioneering activists and abolitionists of their day. i think she comes as close there as
. >> democracy is at its best when they all have a seat at the table. but in america there's a big gap. we need more women in office. >> men hold 82% of the seats in the house of representatives. a decade ago, our nation ranked ninth 57 nations as a percentage of women in congress. today we are 92nd. out of 50 governors come just five are women. that's 10%, the same percentage as the number of women mayors in the 100 largest cities. out of more than 7000 state legislators, fewer than one in four are women. that's barely higher than it was two decades ago. at this rate women will be underrepresented in the united states for another 500 years. a century ago in 1920, the decades long struggle for women to win the righ right to vocal e in the 19th amendment to the constitution. inspired by that struggle, representation 2020 takes on this centrist challenge for women. we must have parity for women in office. that will happen when any given election a woman is just as likely as a man to win and in any given legislature, women will be just likely told them. i founded the white house project where we t
>>> good morning, america. this morning, inside the fire zone. we're on the front lines of the all-out battle to contain the giant wildfire raging in yosemite national park. how this fire is creatings it own weather and now jeopardizing rows of giant sequoias, the symbols of the park system. >>. ♪ when will i hide below >> a singer silenced as linda ronstadt says she has parkensons. why she can no longer sing, and why it took eight years to diagnose nose. >> cry for help, a boy hearing robbers breaking in and alls 911. >> i'm going to have to whisper because they are coming here. >> what the dispatcher told him to do next. >>> and the running of the bulls comes to america. this morning, the backlash and the thousands of adrenaline junkies in virginia who decided to go for it anyway. >> good morning, america! >> from abc news, live from new york, this is "good morning america" with dan harris and bianna golodryga. >> good morning on this very busy sunday. we want to get to the top story this morning, the wildfire raging into yosemite national park. >> morning, it's threatening hom
news at www.aljazeera.com [♪ music ] >> on america tonight. >> nothing today is more serious, and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. >> sharp words from washington leave little doubt what the u.s. thinks happened to these syrian victims. now focus turns to how and when the world will respond. >>> and the threat to california's most mighty residents. the enormous blazes that have also triggered fears for san francisco's water supply. also tonight we're keeping up the fight for chicago. a community left in a constant state of mourning and wondering how will the violence ever end? >> i'm so tired of doing funerals of young men getting killed through gun violence whether by th the police or anor gang. it just wears you down. [♪ music ] >> good evening, and welcome to america tonight. i'm ow joie chen. we start with a high stakes for the united states and the international community. it was these picture, gruesome, grizzly images, hundreds of men, women and children fell by something a week ago that has led increased pressure on damascus to explain and the european capi
. >> this international form cannot be violated without consequences. >> america's toughening position as secretary of state john kerry says the u.s. is now all but certain syria has resorted to using chemical weapons. >> new dangers as the nation's biggest forest fire now threatens thousands of buildings, water and energy sources and america's cherished trees. >> a senior muslim brotherhood leader accusing the military run government there are terrorism. >> the secret service agent grabbed her hand and the gun. >> this chilling flashback as former president gerald ford recounts an assassination attempt on his life 30 years ago. ♪ theme >> syria's foreign minister says a potential u.s. strike on syria would serve the interest of groups there in response to a chemical weapons attack that killed 355 people last week in damascus. in a speech moments ago, assad's second in command telling secretary of state john kerr we his regime has not gone against the u.n. investigation. >> it has said that the government used a chemical agent. i categorically deny to mr. kerry, i reiterate there is no single cou
>> it's august 30th. this is a fox news alert. america loses a key ally. america's top ally now backing out. what that means about a possible strike going forward. the biggest union leader in the united states turning sour on obama care. >> when the act is put together it wasn't thought completely through. >> not thought completely through. can they win the healthcare battle with the unions jumping ship. >> it is not just your wallets with economic pain. even the tooth fairy is getting hit. kids receiving more than ever now. "fox & friends first" starts right now. >> good morning to the city who never sleeps. you can see that outside this morning. you are watching "fox & friends first" on this friday morning. i am heather nauert. >> i am patti ann browne. thank you for starting your day with us. we begin with a fox news alert. president obama in a bind after america's bigs ally backs away from taking action in syria. go to doug luzader live in washington with the latest. >> good morning. whatever coalition the president was hoping to build here now appears to be in at that timer
... [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google and the world brain. >> the horrors of solitary confinement in prison on movies and television, on shawshank redemption, and hbo's oz. whatever it's called, with he all know it's a place you don't want to go. >> i want to protect you. ple you out of that one bunk and cast you out with the sodomites. >> to take a closer look at solitary, and why more than 80,000 inmates find themselves there, dolores, she's from anaheim, california, and she's the mother of john martinez, convicted in 1992 of second-degree murder, and he has spent the last years in solitary confinement in pellic an bay. and richard macnamara, a corrections officer at
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their -- work hard to understand the industry you operate in. working to nurture new ventures and provide capital for strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." thatay after the clashes killed more than 600 people in egypt, president obama condemned the violence but cut short of cutting off aid. >> our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets. >> a car bomb rips through a suburb of beirut, killing 18 people and a stronghold of hezbollah. revealed species was to the world today. actually it has been hiding in plain sight. welcome to our viewers on public television in
'll bring all the details on that in just a few moments. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. hi, my name is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. [♪ music ] >> major developments out of japan regarding the water leak out of the fukushima water plant. the warning has been raised from the level one to a level three. t
euros. >> welcome to the week in the americas. coming up, facing charges, two with cocaine stashed in their baggage say they were forced to smuggle the drugs. plus, the passing of one of america's best-known crime writers, elmore leonard has died at the age of 87. but first, two young women from scotland to northern ireland, have made an initial court appearance in peru are they face charges of trying to smuggle 11 kilos of cocaine out of the country. they face between 15 and 18 years behind bars if convicted, but they claim they were kidnapped by a drug cartel and forced to transport the drugs. william hildebrand has the story. what is your nationality? k --llis or read and kellaa reid and maccallum were arrested with 11 kilos of cocaine packed in their bank. >> they were very nervous, confused. they do not speak spanish so it is difficult for them to communicate. >> they say they work forced to carry the cocaine, timing an armed gang recruited them while they were working in bars in the spanish island of the beast a ibiza.-- of th they may have been pawns in a larger plot. >> the
to this deployment of chemical weapons is in america's core self interest, and the president said the syrian government carried these attacks out. if you circumstance -- circle a couple of dates on the calendar here, you mentioned those un inspectors. it's very clear that the administration or any allied coalition is not going to initiate an attack while those un inspectors are on the ground. then tuesday the president is scheduled to leave the country. he was going to go see putin, and that got changed, instead he is going sweden before going to the g20 meeting. a lot of folks think the president might want to consult with leaders at the g20. others say that is not likely to have this hanging in the air while they are talking about the economy. also another wild-card here, if the british go wobbly in his term on this, and parlment does balk, then that throws another twist and angle into the potential timing. >> mike, tell us precedent for this. >> well, i think the most direct precedent is 1993 and 1998. 1993 a plot was uncovered tos a -- s a nate president bush. really underscoring the sym
mayoral candidate and the man who will be paying for the braces on the teeth of america's comedians, anthony weiner. first, something more important. your right to vote. after months on the political sidelines, mrs. clinton took up the fight yesterday, condemning the supreme court's recent position to gut the voter's rights act and the string of red states rushing to aid in its demise. yesterday, north carolina joined texas, mississippi and alabama in passing strict voter i.d. requirements, a move mrs. clinton says will usher in the old demons of discrimination. >> in 2013, so far, more than 80 bills restricting voting rights have been introduced in 31 states. now, not every obstacle is related to race but everyone who says that racial crimination is no longer a problem in american elections must not be paying attention. >> john: the speech delivered before the american bar association, the first of a series of addresses mrs. clinton plans to give this fall, each one addressing a challenge she says is undermining america's faith in government. well, hey, why wait? i'm sure she's jus
also didn't demand that america somehow give us preferences in the form of racial and ethnic quota. in fact, being asian in california pretty much meant we didn't receive any of those quota or preferences. but racial quota and preferences were dolled out quite lavishly to sons and daughters of dennists, doctors, and other middle class professionals who belonged to racial categories that were far more in fashion in our society. regardless, in the end we prevailed. we prevailed over the welfare state. we got out. certainly we didn't do it alone. the kindness of the american people has always impressed me. i think it's something that impresses all immigrants to this country. and we remain grateful to those who offered a helping hand and a warm smile. repeatedly, when i was reading a piece in the "the wall street journal" written by governor jeb bush, i thought of my family's journey out of the ghetto. he said "today the sad real city if you're born poor, if you're parents didn't go to college, if you don't know your father, and if english is not spoken at home, then the odds are stack
. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> welcome back to al-jazeera. i'm del walters. there are more accusations by snowden on nsa spying. he says 450 communications from the u.n. headquarters were also compromised. and at this hour, a train has derailed in russia -- mexico injuring commuters but it can not be determined what caused the derailment. >>> the trial of hosni mubarak was adjourned until september 14th. here is jonathan betz with more on the court hearings today. >> two big stories here in court today concerning hosni mubarak. the first one, the charges for the deaths of protestors for the uprising in 2011. he appears in court wearing sunglasses and in a cage. there were questions as to whether he would appear in court but he did to make it clear to the court and those watching as it is streamed across egypt that he will face tho
. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
praised essential new book "collision 2012", obama versus romney and the future of elections in america. he joins us now from washington, d.c. dan, what a pleasure. thank you so much for being here on "viewpoint." >> john, thank you. >> john: congratulations to all of the acclaim your book has received. as you know, this weekend in iowa, both santorum and cruz criticized the romney campaign for its use of the catchphrase "you did build that." their argument it was another instance of him cozying up to the rich republicans. was that mitt romney's core problem as you see it? >> well, it was certainly a problem, john, in this respect. governor romney and president obama look at the economy from two totally different perspectives. their life experiences push them in different directions. when governor romney talked about the economy, he often talked about it from the perspective of job creators, whether small business people or larger business owners. he did not talk about the economy in terms of the working people. the people who were working in those factories or in the small businesses.
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
south. every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >> this is just the beginning of something much bigger. >> thank god i didn't have to suffer what he had to go through. >> this sunday, the premiere of "into eternity". >> i am now in this place where you should never come. >> how do you contain 100,000 years of nuclear danger? >> it is an invisible danger. >> al jazeera america presents "into eternity". premieres sunday night 9 eastern. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> coming up on al jazeera this evening, the lingering problems with nuclear power. every day radioactive wasted from power plants is isolated. the documentary" into eternity" covers the facilities. 100,000 years scientists say living there will need to know about. dangers. >> this is probably the
, but in chicago it's reading, writing and risk. >>> and immigrants in somalia making a new home in america down on the farm. and you can kiss that puppy goodbye, chula vista would answer back. they would come up clutch. jianca rlo, and california is back on top, 4-3. but buckle up, this game was a rollercoaster ride. the bottom of the fifth, they would probably be very good at that also. that is it for al-jazeera america. >> welcome back to al jazeera. i'm dell walters. chicago's public schools are under the microscope as more than 400,000 children are back in class. many of these children attending new schools under less than desirable circumstances. faced with unfamiliar neighborhood and forced to walk longer distances to get through, and then through violenc violend gang-ridden areas. it does sound like reading, writing and risk, are the kids safe? >> reporter: that's right. that's something on the minds of teachers, students and parents today. they have 300 safe passage designated routes over the school year for students to get their kids to newly designated schools. police will be along th
. the running of the bulls has come to america. and not everybody is cheering. abc's susan sellny has more. >> up to now, if you felt like running for your life hoping not to be gored to death by thousand pound bulls, it meant taking a trip to pamplona, spain. that was then, this is now. look closely. those are not the cobblestone streets of an ancient village. the dust being kicked up is on a racetrack in dinwoody, virginia, where an american version of the spanish spectacle has begun in a big way. it's the great bull run and may be coming to a town near you. >> can't wait, i'm excited. crazy adrenaline rush. >> when the bulls come out, i didn't know what to do. ran straight, turn around and ran into people. >> reporter: adventure seekers are signing up for upcoming events in atlanta, houston, dallas, chicago and other cities. >> everybody is going to see this, i can do that, run with the bulls, it's going to take off nationwide. >> reporter: but that's not without controversy. even the organizers recognize that bull running is inherently dangerous. this morning, two runners are recoverin
'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. >>> the american soldier responsible for killing 16 afghan civilians is apologizing. robert bales took the stand in the sentencing phase of his military trial, and rob reynolds reports on his apology, and what it means for his case. >> reporter: i wish i could take it back, but i can't. speaking in a low, halting voice, bales apologized to the families of the african civilians he murdered, and said he disgraced his own family. what i did was an act of cowardous bales concluded, behind a mas
. occupied-- >> al jazeera america. is did. >> this is the hundred page document we call obamacare. and my staff has read the entire thing. can congress say the same? >> "real money with ali velshi" tonight on al jazeera america. >> welcome back, this is a look at the top stories on al jazeera. recapping now the united nations security council is holding an emergency meeting sawing saying hundreds of people attacked the european union have expressed grave concern about the reports of the use of chemical weapons in syria. they will insure an investigation. >> a former egyptian president has anhosni mubarak will be reld from house arrest. the prosecutors say the constitution prevents them from appealing the ruling. we're learning new activities from the nsa. today we learned it the agency connected thousand of internet communications in the u.s. with no terror connections. the intent of the program was to intercept terrorist communications. we go to karen, the direct ever of the center of th of school o. are we surprised of what we're learning particularly over the last four months, and at s
and import of american man slips with ivan's made in america compared to the foreign ships with items and products made in foreign lands ? if they're is a lot of balance there at least why would we want to have more foreign chips? how many homes are we going to lose? said the one okay. >> guest: in the part of virginia i can tell you that our ratio of import to export is about 50-50 which is a great place to be. from this country we are sending over, like i said before, you know, paper and pulp and logs and agriculture and importing those foreign finished things that are made, you know, elsewhere. in the united states their is a huge push tow reassure some offshore manufacturing. the part of virginia wants to be the conduit for trade. >> host: you said it is 5050, pretty much equal. what does that matter, do you think? >> guest: we obviously want commerce coming and going from both, you know, manufacturers, producers, agriculture and the debt is states, both farmers and businesses want places to send their goods. there is a demand overseas, and we have to pay attention to both export
with strong economics, and we are weaker with bad economics. the problems in latin america, the countries that are in trouble, they will affect us because the problems that goes on in those countries will spillover into the stable partners that we need. we need the neighbors to be just as stable. >> think you're absolutely right. i think that the future lies in understanding that despite the pivot to asia, the intention that is being brought to bear on china, the huge market, the huge challenges and opportunities, the americans are unique. a set of common, core values that bind the americas together. human capital is our most important asset. diversity of that human capital. i was born in mexico. half armenian. i now live in the united states. this human capitol that we had, it's complement's. this is the future promise. that is what we have to bind together, whether it is, you know, through the tpp and expanded trade agreement that will bind the countries that believe in that core set of values. it is providing the issues that are not put on the table in naphtha when it was initiated bac
with paula broadwell, he is reinventing himself in america's media capital, taking a teaching gig. >> life doesn't stop with such a mistake and can and must go on. >> reporter: petraeus joins a long line of officials who were involved in scandals. public reasonings expert has covered everyone to -- take immediate responsibility. apologize to the right people, his wife and the american people. and remove yourself from controversy, meaning don't fight to stay on as cia director. it didn't hurt that the president granted petraeus a graceful exit. >> he has provided this country an extraordinary service. >> what could be a more attractive thing than that kind of sendoff. >> reporter: but his past hasn't been perfect. he was set to make $150,000 for teaching students three hours a week. >> my initial reaction was outrageous. >> reporter: the doctor says most would get $3,000 for teaching that seminar, and the school's mission is to provide an affordable session. >> once again, it's how he is quick on his feet. i would say before the ink was dry on that first story there was no story. >> reporte
, civil rights and how things have changed in america. >> one of the things that dr. king was talking about, in my opinion, it was not so much civil rights for us but civil rights period. >> reporter: a marine who served in afghanistan and iraq, and now he's a senior at the university of southern new orleans. >> we've got a bus loaded foul o--foul--full of african-americ. let's bring everyone down here. i don't care. >> reporter: on the bus many reflect on the stride made since 1963, people are also asking the question how much has been done, and how much can be done? >> people are people. everybody is the same. if america wants to be the country, a great country, everybody has to be equal. everybody has to have opportunities. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning. >> reporter: in 1963 marchers arrived by bus, train, car and foot. today 50 years later it's the same. and for the people on this bus the celebration of king's dream is the expression of hope for even greater strides towards guaranteeing the rights of all americans. robert ray
, they are trying to place in america in the important role of history. this is where they would have dinner. they would have a chance to meet one another, conversed socially and casually, and then they might be invited to dine in the dining room. after supper, the ladies would then adjourn back into the drawing room. maybe they would serve some coffee and tea. this was the social center of the house. if you were an invited guest of the madisons or part of the intimate circle of family or friends, you would be invited into the dining room from the drawing room. and here, dolly madison would in an unusual setting for the timeframe set at the head of the table and her husband, james, would sit at the center of the table. dolly would direct in, it -- with direct the conversation and james would be able to engage in intimate conversation with the people immediately to his right and left. this table today is that for eight people, but there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. that would not be unusual. and indeed, dolly madison considered dining at maag pier to be so much mor
of the migration of blacks who did something that no blacks in america -- went against the grain of the great migration that went from south to the northern industrial cities and if it came west, it came to oakland, san fransisco, and l.a., but there was a tribe of black, black oakees from the south and southwest, who wanted to retain the rural lifestyle. it was very important for them to feel the wind at night, to be out in places where no one bothered them, to be close to the land. about 25-30,000 of them didn't go to the industrial cities. they went from rural to rural, following the cotton trail west, and james dixon was one of them. he was from louisiana. he worked in the railroads for a while as a porter. when i met him, he was -- he had a water pump here and a little pecan tree, and he was cutting down the pecan tree to burn fire to keep himself warm. he was five-foot-five, sleeping on a little iron crate. the crate was too small for him, so he had a wooden beekeeper's box for his head. there were -- i'll looking inside, and there were veinna sausage cans, empty ones, that had had put
. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, you are consuming them. that's next on "consider this." >>> consider this on an issue as far reaching as same-sex marriage, does the individual have the power to make major policy changes? last week one man in new mexico decided to begin issuing couples. >> we dropped everything and ran over here, that's why he only has a tank top on. >> she came out to the kitchen and was like do you want to get married? and i was like funny, funny. >> by virtue of the authority vested in me by the state of new mexico i now pronounce you spouses for life. >> yesterday a state district judge declared same-sex marriage legal in new mexico, that ruling only applied to two additional counties, but today three more counties decided to issue same-sex marriage licenses, and so far hundreds of couples have obtained those licenses. here so discuss this is the
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